Fresnoland

Donate to the Fresnoland Lab

We’re a reporting and engagement lab dedicated to uncovering important stories and solutions around housing, development, land use, and water in the Central San Joaquin Valley.

Where you live can be life-changing. For the century and a half that the Central San Joaquin Valley has been urbanized, policies and investments in infrastructure have created vast differences in opportunity depending on your neighborhood. A person who lives in Fresno’s Lowell neighborhood, north of downtown, has an average life expectancy of 70.4 years – 15 years less than a person who lives just a few miles north in Fresno’s Fort Washington neighborhood.

Fresno is, in many ways, at the forefront of many changes occurring in both California and the United States. As one of the youngest and most diverse cities and regions in the US, we are ground zero for what one potential future of the country could look like in twenty years. We are one of California’s fastest-growing regions, yet we haven’t figured out yet how to harness our growth to better support the communities and neighborhoods that have long existed in the region. Where we build new infrastructure, housing, and services says a lot about what neighborhoods we prioritize the most.

The Fresnoland Lab seeks to investigate, discuss potential solutions, and engage those that have the most at stake in driving the conversation.

Here’s our planned activities to meet this goal:

Civic Documenters Program: the Lab plans to recruit, train, and deploy a network of 20-30 citizen journalists to attend and document public and community meetings throughout the region; develop an open-source repository of information for community media partners to share and use for their reporting; and, build the contributions of the documenters into reporting projects for the Fresnoland Lab.

Weekly Newsletter: we will feature original reporting in addition to our curation of the week’s most important local stories, in a weekly email newsletter.

Daily Stories: we plan to produce high-utility news for readers that serve the information needs of residents in the region, especially those from diverse communities.

Enterprise Reporting: these are longer, deeply reported stories that dive into data and attempt to explain complicated policies and build a broader understanding of the challenges and solutions to addressing regional inequality and the local housing crisis.

Public Newsrooms: the Lab plans on hosting at least 8 Public Newsroom events to connect and build relationships with residents of the region’s diverse communities; feature local public scholars and community journalists; and, identify key narratives, themes, and topics for future coverage by the Lab. Public Newsroom events will be held at various community centers and libraries and will include Spanish/Hmong translation, childcare, and snacks. One Public Newsroom will be held primarily in Spanish and another primarily in Hmong.

Community Advisory Board: the Lab will work with the Fresnoland Advisory Board, a 15-member body, on a quarterly basis to reflect and iterate from previous content developed by the Lab and develop ideas for future stories and ensure content reflects the nuanced narratives of the region’s diverse communities.

We’re a reporting and engagement lab dedicated to uncovering important stories and solutions around housing, development, land use, and water in the Central San Joaquin Valley.

Where you live can be life-changing. For the century and a half that the Central San Joaquin Valley has been urbanized, policies and investments in infrastructure have created vast differences in opportunity depending on your neighborhood. A person who lives in Fresno’s Lowell neighborhood, north of downtown, has an average life expectancy of 70.4 years – 15 years less than a person who lives just a few miles north in Fresno’s Fort Washington neighborhood.

Fresno is, in many ways, at the forefront of many changes occurring in both California and the United States. As one of the youngest and most diverse cities and regions in the US, we are ground zero for what one potential future of the country could look like in twenty years. We are one of California’s fastest-growing regions, yet we haven’t figured out yet how to harness our growth to better support the communities and neighborhoods that have long existed in the region. Where we build new infrastructure, housing, and services says a lot about what neighborhoods we prioritize the most.

The Fresnoland Lab seeks to investigate, discuss potential solutions, and engage those that have the most at stake in driving the conversation.

Here’s our planned activities to meet this goal:

Civic Documenters Program: the Lab plans to recruit, train, and deploy a network of 20-30 citizen journalists to attend and document public and community meetings throughout the region; develop an open-source repository of information for community media partners to share and use for their reporting; and, build the contributions of the documenters into reporting projects for the Fresnoland Lab.

Weekly Newsletter: we will feature original reporting in addition to our curation of the week’s most important local stories, in a weekly email newsletter.

Daily Stories: we plan to produce high-utility news for readers that serve the information needs of residents in the region, especially those from diverse communities.

Enterprise Reporting: these are longer, deeply reported stories that dive into data and attempt to explain complicated policies and build a broader understanding of the challenges and solutions to addressing regional inequality and the local housing crisis.

Public Newsrooms: the Lab plans on hosting at least 8 Public Newsroom events to connect and build relationships with residents of the region’s diverse communities; feature local public scholars and community journalists; and, identify key narratives, themes, and topics for future coverage by the Lab. Public Newsroom events will be held at various community centers and libraries and will include Spanish/Hmong translation, childcare, and snacks. One Public Newsroom will be held primarily in Spanish and another primarily in Hmong.

Community Advisory Board: the Lab will work with the Fresnoland Advisory Board, a 15-member body, on a quarterly basis to reflect and iterate from previous content developed by the Lab and develop ideas for future stories and ensure content reflects the nuanced narratives of the region’s diverse communities.

Learn more about the Fresnoland Lab

The Fresnoland Lab is funded, in part, by a grant from the Central Valley Community Foundation (CVCF). CVCF maintains control over the disbursement of all funds. While donors and contributors may direct funds to specific projects within the Impact Media and Measurement Fund, they do not have editorial control over content produced with fund resources, or the interpretation of data. CVCF, funders, donors, and all related projects will be held to strict donor transparency and editorial independence policies including but not limited to publicly listing the names of any donors or funders who contribute more than $1,000 in a calendar year. For full transparency and ethics guidelines, click here.

Contributions to the Impact Media and Measurement Fund will be tax-deductible as provided by law, and meet the exempt purposes set forth in the Internal Revenue Code section 501(c)(3).

The Fresnoland Lab is funded, in part, by a grant from the Central Valley Community Foundation (CVCF). CVCF maintains control over the disbursement of all funds. While donors and contributors may direct funds to specific projects within the Impact Media and Measurement Fund, they do not have editorial control over content produced with fund resources, or the interpretation of data. CVCF, funders, donors, and all related projects will be held to strict donor transparency and editorial independence policies including but not limited to publicly listing the names of any donors or funders who contribute more than $1,000 in a calendar year. For full transparency and ethics guidelines, click here.

Contributions to the Impact Media and Measurement Fund will be tax-deductible as provided by law, and meet the exempt purposes set forth in the Internal Revenue Code section 501(c)(3).